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Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. (C)- Ivan Berryman Art
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Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. (C)


Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. (C)

As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies. With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going. But there was a problem. Too few trucks, and too few drivers. The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative. Action was needed, and quickly. Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed. the Allies would advance on a broad front. But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance. For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven. The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem. On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine. On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge. The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine. Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived. But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne. Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine. Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out. If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944. Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : DHM1841CRoad to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. (C) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT101st Airborne edition of 125 prints

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm) Shames, Ed
True, William
Wingett, Bill
Soboleski, Frank (companion print)
Taylor, Amos Buck (companion print)
Rogers, Paul (companion print)
Joint, Ed
Tipper, Ed
Zimmermann, Hank (companion print)
Koskimaki, George
Hallow, Ed
Burgett, Don
Bain, Rod (companion print)
Peruginni, Phil
McClung, Earl (companion print)
Martin, James (companion print)
Vicari, Vinnie (companion print)
Lyall, Clancy (companion print)
Perconte, Frank (companion print)
Maynard, Bill
Suerth, Herb
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £325
SOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor.DHM1841
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 450 prints. Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm) Tipper, Ed
Maynard, Bill
Suerth, Herb
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £50
£60 Off!
+ Free
Shipping!

Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £210.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
101st Airborne edition of 225 artist proofs

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm) Shames, Ed
True, William
Wingett, Bill
Soboleski, Frank (companion print)
Taylor, Amos Buck (companion print)
Rogers, Paul (companion print)
Joint, Ed
Tipper, Ed
Zimmermann, Hank (companion print)
Koskimaki, George
Hallow, Ed
Burgett, Don
Bain, Rod (companion print)
Peruginni, Phil
McClung, Earl (companion print)
Martin, James (companion print)
Vicari, Vinnie (companion print)
Lyall, Clancy (companion print)
Perconte, Frank (companion print)
Maynard, Bill
Suerth, Herb
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £325
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
PRINTCollectors edition of 350 prints Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm) Shames, Ed
True, William
Wingett, Bill
Joint, Ed
Tipper, Ed
Koskimaki, George
Hallow, Ed
Burgett, Don
Maynard, Bill
Suerth, Herb
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £155
£60 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £265.00VIEW EDITION...
REMARQUECollectors remarque edition of 10 prints

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm) Shames, Ed
True, William
Wingett, Bill
Joint, Ed
Tipper, Ed
Koskimaki, George
Hallow, Ed
Burgett, Don
Peruginni, Phil
Maynard, Bill
Suerth, Herb
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £170
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Extra Details : Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. (C)
About this edition :

Companion Print :



Long Hard Road
The men of Easy Company, 506th P.I.R., 101st Airborne Division, prepare for their parachute drop into enemy occupied territory from Upottery airfield on the eve of D-Day, June, 1944.

Companion print size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 64cm) Image size 23 inches x 15.5 inches (56cm x 40cm)

About all editions :

Detail Images :



Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Captain Vinnie Vicari
*Signature Value : £10

D Company, 101st Airborne


Colonel Ed Shames
*Signature Value : £30

Enlisting in September 1942, Ed Shames was to become one of the most respected officers in the 101st Airborne Division, a stickler for detail he always got the job done, and brought his men home. Originally assigned to I Company in the 3rd Battalion of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment he was then transferred to Headquarters Company. He received a battlefield commission during the taking of Carentan in Normandy, and joined Easy Company in July 1944 as a 2nd Lieutenant prior to Operation Market Garden and the Battle of the Bulge.


Corporal Frank Perconte
*Signature Value : £15

Frank Perconte was born on March 10th, 1917 in Indiana. His family came from Sicily and settled in the US. Frank Perconte grew up in a typical US-Italian neighborhood and started work at the Gary Steel Mill before being recruited to become a paratrooper At the age of 26 Frank Perconte joined the army and was in Easy Company of the 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. Frank went to Toccoa for training before heading overseas to Britain. On June 6th, D-Day 1944 Frank jumped into Normandy. He landed in Saint Marie du Mont. Frank Perconte was also at Bastogne. After the war he retired and got back to the steel mill for a short time and later became a mailman. Perconte is portrayed in the famous series Band of Brother and While the HBO miniseries was being made, Perconte and several other Easy Company members were flown to England, to watch the filming and to talk with the actors, who quizzed the veterans for details to enrich their performances.


Corporal Herb Jr Suerth
*Signature Value : £25

18 year old Herb Suerth enlisted as a volunteer for the Reserve Engineer Corps on 11th November 1942, but after a change of heart in 1944 he was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, beginning parachute school training in August that year. After final combat training in Holland, Herb was trucked into Bastogne in December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge, also fighting in Foy. On 9th January 1945 Herb was wounded by artillery fire and his legs were severely injured but ultimately saved. He was shipped out of England and back to the US on 8th April 1945.


First Sergeant Frank Soboleski
*Signature Value : £10

Joining the Army in 1943, Frank Soboleski parachuted into Holland in September 1944 as part of the 101st Airbornes reserve unit, ready to help if the first two units needed it - they did. Franks unit, Easy Company, was next in combat at Bastogne; surrounded by Germans in the freezing cold for a month. The company then moved on to Haguenau in France, and finally to Berchtesgaden in southern Germany when the war ended. Frank remained in southern Germany and Austria for another six months and was discharged in January 1946.


M/Sgt Clancy Lyall
*Signature Value : £15

E Company, 101st Airborne. Clarence "Clancy" Lyall was born on 14th October 1925 in Orange, Texas. In 1939 Lyall moved to Pennsylvania and joined the Army in 1942. Lyall went to Florida in 1943 for basic training and in April 1943 went to Airborne School, and this was followed with further training in Communications and Demolition. In May 1944 Lyall joined the 2nd Battalion 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. During Operation Overlord, Lyall landed in a tree 2 miles from St Mere-Eglise. He was cut down out of the tree by his fried Jim Campbell. Lyall spent a few days fighting around St Mere-Eglise with the 82nd Airborne, but managed to get back to Carentan 3 days later. In August 1944 as part of the Operation Market Garden Lyall was with E company. In September Lyall participated in the liberation of Endhoven and conitnued to fight through October and December through the Battle of the Bulge where Easy Company held strong defensive positions at Foy and Bastogne. Heavy fighting ensued as a large scale German attack commenced with heavy losses received. On March 15th 1945 the 101st airbirne receieved a Presidential Unit Citation, the first to a Division. Lyall would also go on to serve in Korea and Vietnam.
Operations Sergeant Ed Hallow
*Signature Value : £15

A Company, 101st Airborne


Private 1st Class Bill Wingett
*Signature Value : £10

Bill Wingett originally enlisted on 9th December 1941, two days after Pearl Harbor was attacked, but after a car crash, hospitalisation and subsequent discharge from the forces meant he had to try again on 19th August 1942. Bill was with Easy Company up until 5 days before D-Day where he was transferred to Headquarters Company. He fought in the campaigns of Normandy, Holland and Bastogne receiving a Purple Heart in each. Discharged on 23rd November 1945, Bill returned 10 months later to join the 82nd Airborne for 3 years as a maintenance man at Fort Bragg Airfield.


Private Ed Joint
*Signature Value : £10

We were sent out to take a machine gun position. It was just before the battle of Foy ended. I was running up a hill and got hit by shrapnel in my right arm. I went flying up in the air, I didn't know at first what hit me. Somebody hollered for a medic. They put me on a stretcher and took me to a field hospital. They couldn't do nothing with it there, so they took me back and put me in a hospital in Paris. A medic said, You can go home now soldier, you ain't going to fight no more. But twenty days later I hitchhiked back to Company E to find them. They were just getting ready to go to Germany. What made me want to go back and fight? I don't know. They were my outfit, my friends.


Private Hank Zimmerman
*Signature Value : £10

2nd Battalion, E Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment.
Private James Martin
*Signature Value : £15

G Company, 101st Airborne
Private Phil Peruginni
*Signature Value : £15

E Company, 101st Airborne
S/ Sgt George Koskimaki
*Signature Value : £10

101st Signal Company


S/Sgt Earl McClung
*Signature Value : £15

E Company, 101st Airborne. Kaprun, AustriaI thought I had died and gone to heaven there. My job was to hunt and feed the prisoners that the Germans had taken for slave labor who were incarcerated there. The prisoners were freed by then but they had no place to go. I think they were Polish and Romanian mostly. The job fell to us to feed them. I fed them stag and chamois (goats with little hooked horns) until they were coming out of the ears. So I finally got to do some hunting like I enjoyed. I just camped out. [My outfit] saw me maybe once or twice a week.


Sergant Ed Tipper
*Signature Value : £10

When I came out of the Army I walked with a cane and wore an eye patch. The thing I remember most was the tremendous response of everybody I met to do everything they could do to show support for the military. Maybe the support felt exaggerated to me because I had clearly been shot up and wounded. Whenever I ate at a restaurant I went to the cashier and there was almost never a bill. Or the waitress nodded her head and said, A gentleman over at that table has paid. Of course I was home a year ahead of everybody else. But that sort of thing happened to me a lot.


Sergeant Amos Buck Taylor
*Signature Value : £25

Having worked in a factory making Sherman Tanks, Buck aided the war effort even further by becoming a Paratrooper and enlisted in July 1942 before being assigned to 3rd Platoon upon his arrival at Toccoa. When jumping into Europe on D-Day he was 2nd Squad Leader but having scattered on the jump, it was not until several days later that he joined up with the rest of the company, just prior to the attack on Carentan during which he was made 3rd Platoon Sergeant. At the Battle of the Bulge, when advancing from Bastogne to Foy, Buck was badly injured when shot in the leg which saw the end of his war spending 11months in hospital.


Sergeant Don Burgett
*Signature Value : £15

A Company, 101st Airborne.Donald "Don" R. Burgett was born on April 5, 1925 in Detroit, Michigan. On his 18th birthday, on April 5th, 1943 Donald joined the paratroopers enlisting in Detroit, Michigan. They sent Donald Burgett to Fort Riley, Kansas in order to join the last Unit of the Horse Cavalry still running. He thus did his basic training with the 2nd Regiment of the 1st Horse Cavalry. When he ended his basic training, he was transferred to the Army Paratroops at Fort Benning where he got his parachute training. On February 5, 1944, he left the United States. He travelled through Ireland and Scotland before arriving in England. He joined the 101st Airborne in Aldbourne, England in February 1944. On June 6th at 1:14 a.m. nearby Ravenoville Donald Burgett was the 6th to jump. Their main mission was to capture and hold 4 exits of the beaches of Utah Beach. The gathered troop under the command of platoon leader, 2nd Lt Bill Muir with some other men and with some of the 82nd Airborne, attacked and freed Ravenoville, the first village of Europe of WWII to be re occupied. The 82nd Airborne occupied Ste Mere Eglise, the first city being released in Normandy during the night of June 6, 1944. Burgett was wounded twice, on June 13, 44, while attacking with his bayonet in southern Carentan while attacking positions held by the 17th SS and 6th German Paratroopers. Burgett woudl go onto fight in other battles, Arnhem, Bastogne and Rhine Crossing. Donald Burgett is the author of a number of books which are: "The Road to Arnhem" about Holland, "Seven roads to Hell" about Bastogne and "Beyond the Rhine" about Germany. A great insight


Sergeant Paul Rogers
*Signature Value : £25

Aged 24, Paul Rogers volunteered to be a Paratrooper in 1942 and soon found himself at Toccoa training under Colonel Sink. When jumping into Europe on D-Day, Paul lost most of his equipment, including his rifle, and his parachute snagged on trees from which he had to cut himself loose; he later found out he had landed eight miles from the intended drop zone. With the 3rd Battalion he fought throughout Normandy but was injured when jumping into Holland as part of Operation Market Garden and subsequently spent four weeks in hospital. Upon rejoining the platoon he stayed with them all the way through to Hitlers Eagles Nest in Berchtesgaden.


Sergeant Rod Bain
*Signature Value : £15

E Comapny, 506th Parchute Infantry Regiment.


The signature of Sergeant William True

Sergeant William True
*Signature Value : £15

Bill True served with the 506th Parachute Regiment which was attached to the 101st Airborne. He took part in the initial parachute drop into France with the 101st on D-Day, and by the end of the day they were in control of the high ground overlooking the invasion beach. Bill made his second combat drop with the 101st near Eindhoven during Operation Market Garden, before, in December 1944, finding himself in the thick of the action defending the town of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge, where the 506th defended the eastern perimeter section of the town. Advancing into Germany, the 506th's final mission of the war was the capture of Hitler's Eagle Nest at Bergtesgarden on 4th - 5th May 1945.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
DakotaDOUGLAS DAKOTA, Transport aircraft with three crew and can carry 28 passengers. speed 230-mph, and a altitude of 23,200 feet. maximum range 2,100 miles. The Douglas Dakota served in all theatres of world war two, The Royal Air Force received its first Douglas Dakota's in April 1941, to 31 squadron which was serving in India. These were DC2, later DC3 and eventually C-47 Dakotas were supplied. The Douglas Dakota was developed from the civil airliner of the 1930's. The Royal Air Force received nearly 2,000 Dakotas, But many more than this served in the US Air Force and other allied countries. The last flight of a Douglas Dakota of the Royal Air Force was in 1970. You can still see Douglas Dakota's in operational and transport use across the world.

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